Missile false alarm causes panic for PGA Tour players

A combination photograph shows screenshots from a cell phone displaying an alert for a ballistic missile launch and the subsequent false alarm message in Hawaii January 13, 2018. REUTERS/Hugh Gentry
Jan 13, 2018; Honolulu, HI, USA; (Editors Notes: Caption Correction) PGA golfer John Peterson tees off on the first hole during the third round of the Sony Open golf tournament at Waialae Country Club. Mandatory Credit: Brian Spurlock-USA TODAY Sports
An electronic sign reads "There is no threat" in Oahu, Hawaii, U.S., after a false emergency alert that said a ballistic missile was headed for Hawaii, in this January 13, 2018 photo obtained from social media. Instagram/@sighpoutshrug/via REUTERS

(Reuters) - Some of the world's top professional golfers were panicked by a false report of an incoming ballistic missile in Hawaii on Saturday, with one hiding under a mattress and another fleeing to the basement of his Honolulu hotel.

The alert, issued shortly after 8 A.M. local time (1800 GMT), was sent mistakenly some three hours before the start of the third round of the PGA Tour's Sony Open.

"So.......this can't be good. Everyone is freaking out in the hotel," Steve Wheatcroft tweeted at 8.14 A.M. local time (1814 GMT).

Another player, J.J. Spaun, took refuge in his hotel basement.

"Barely any service. Can you send confirmed message over radio or tv," he said in a tweet at 8.26 A.M.

Two minutes after that, John Peterson revealed the evasive steps he had taken.

"Under mattresses in the bathtub with my wife, baby and in laws. Please lord let this bomb threat not be real," tweeted Peterson, who was tied for second place halfway through the tournament.

World number four Justin Thomas, the defending champion, however appeared not to be as perturbed as his fellow professionals.

"To all that just received the warning along with me this morning ... apparently it was a 'mistake' - hell of a mistake!! Haha glad to know we'll all be safe," Thomas tweeted at the same time as Spaun.

Speaking after the third round, which started on time at Waialae Country Club, Thomas said he had not got the original warning and was only aware after he received a screen shot from fellow pro Tom Lovelady.

"I was like 'there's nothing I can do,'" Thomas said of his original equanimity.

"I sat on my couch and opened up the sliding door and watched TV and listened to music.

"I was like, if it's my time, it's my time."

(Reporting by Andrew Both in Cary, North Carolina; Editing by Greg Stutchbury)

You may be interested in

Racers whip across Utah's famed salt flats after...

Aug 17, 2016

Thousands of racers have descended on Utah's famed Bonneville Salt Flats after two years of...

Taking stock: NBC learning about changed viewer...

Aug 19, 2016

NBC says it hopes to take lessons from how some of its tech-savvy consumers are experiencing the...

Sandusky appeal focuses on Victim 2's conflicting...

Aug 22, 2016

Jerry Sandusky's lawyers are focusing on conflicting statements from a man who settled a child sex...

Federer looked into ways to play either Olympics...

Aug 24, 2016

Roger Federer says he contemplated scenarios in which he would play in the Olympics and skip the...

McIlroy glad to be wrong about Olympic success

Aug 24, 2016

This is one time Rory McIlroy says he was happy to be mistaken

About Us

The Final Scoreboard has fast, accurate live scores for you. We provide premium online content from in-depth analysis to the scores and statistics across American and European Sports.

Contact us: sales[at]thefinalscoreboard.com

Subscribe Now!